Friday, November 13, 2009

A MESSAGE FOR CHRIS ROCK: Suicidal Black Men and Black on Black Crime


Argh.... Happy Halloween....Image by Soulfull via Flickr

Enjoyed 'Black Hair.'   It showed what some women are willing to do to themselves in order to achieve a beauty created and defined outside of themselves.

Would like to see what you could do intelligently with the subject of young black men coming out of prison, feeling hopeless and and losing any faith of a chance for a positive future for their lives.

 I read in Liza Mundy's biography "Michelle" that Michelle Obama does not believe her husband would be president if he had not lived in Hawaii when he began to experiment with marijuana.  In the book Mrs. Obama said, "she believed that if he (Barack) had lived in Chicago he would have had a juvenile record and probably would not have been admitted to the prestigious universities he attended."

Our boys and men are not even seen as human; they are real people with genuine feelings, strengths, hopes, and weaknesses.  Most of them are automatically assumed to be pathological until they prove otherwise.  My little brother is 6'6" and has a Muslim name.  People are terrified of him until they find out he is intelligent, went to an ivy league college, and not Muslim.  He has told me that he can physically see the relief in faces and bodies when some people discover he is Christian.

 I would also like to see you discuss or cover how black people physically and /or psychologically attack one one another. These are not amusing or maybe even commercial subjects, but if anyone can find the humor in any of this, it is you. There is too much, brilliance and beauty being wasted.  Think about it.

 In August my little brother (thirty-two years old) was mugged by a young black man in D.C. while he was walking home from the Metro on a week night at 9pm.  He was a few yards away from his house, talking on the cell phone and not paying attention to what was going on around him. He did not see the man come up behind him. The very young man stuck a loaded gun on his face and demanded his money.  My brother did not have any money.  He only had the cell phone. The boy mugger took it and hit him in the face with the gun causing him six stitches around the eye, a busted lip, and terror. Then the inexperienced fool had the nerve to use the cell phone, but the police still did not catch him.  You know, I don't think they even tried.

We Need A Revolution.

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2 comments:

  1. It all seems so impossible, all of the anger and frustration and hopelessness. What CAN we do about it all? I believe there are people doing things about it all over the country in big and small ways. We see it in those who succeed. The successes are not usually shown to us in the major media. I'm so sorry about what happened to the men in your family. My son, who's 28 on 11-21, was held up when he was about 14 yrs old. I myself had my purse snatched on two occassions back in the day. In this world there is alot of pain and suffering and desperation and people do desparate things--harming others--emotionally, physically and spiritually. Thank God that most of us are able to overcome these things and I pray that your son and brother overcome the negativity of these attacks on them.

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  2. I am very glad to hear that you and your son were not hurt when the two of you were robbed. My son and brother are doing fine. What set me off this week was thinking about some conversations that I had with women friends and acquaintances that work with young men. One is a counselor for inmates leaving the Maryland prison system. She was telling that many of the young men are suicidal because they will have a hard time finding a job and know they will not be accepted into society. She said she was running out of things to say to encourage them. There is very little in Baltimore (where she works) for these young men, and they know it. They are pretty much on their on. For some reason, the young woman appear to be more stoic. Whether they are or not I don't know, but there's not many organizations available to help them either.

    Another woman I know works with juveniles who have been put on probation by the court system. They have to call in to her organization several times a day to check in. In other words, she and her staff act as parents to this teenaged boys. Most of them have parents in prison or on drugs; they have very little adult supervision. She said that she had been cussed out so many times that it had stopped shocking her.

    And so I am thinking about what I can do to help.

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